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Of Pixie Dust and Dandruff

The last week has seen a fine particulate matter fall over a large swatch of Quebec, and not all of it is from raging forest fires. What Marc Bergevin may consider as his magic pixie dust, is in fact merely a ton of dandruff caused by the incessant head scratching that Habs fans have been doing over the last week.

Whether confused over the “reach” of drafting Michael McCarron in the first round, or the brand new signing of the freshly bought-out Daniel Briere, Habs fans have had much to talk about in an offseason that is already producing more questions than answers.

By the time news broke late in the afternoon that the Habs had officially signed Daniel Briere to a two-year, eight million dollar deal, Habsland was already ablaze with opinion, most of leaning to the negative side. And who can blame the naysayers? While I jumped for joy when Bergevin dumped Erik Cole for Michael Ryder, I did so thinking that the cap savings would be put to better use. It’s not time to jump to conclusions yet, especially since Briere has not played a game for the Canadiens yet, but the signs on the surface are not encouraging. He’s become injury prone, is in decline and is limited in terms of what he brings to the table. All this on top of being yet another diminutive player on a roster stacked with small players.

There are many, many reasons to be disappointed in this move. There is a distinct sense that the “Habs need Quebecois stars” crowd has penetrated Bergevin’s thought process and struck a chord, especially on the heels of missing out on Lecavalier. I’m not so sure I buy that, but it’s always loomed like a large shadow over in Montreal whenever a French player is brought in. Age, slipping production, health, and size are all additional reasons to be concerned about Bergevin’s judgement in this move. When you consider that Briere will occupy the right wing along with Brian Gionta and Brendan Gallagher, you can’t help but shudder at how this will be a glaring weakness on the road and in the playoffs.

The contract itself isn’t suicidal. Two years at eight million isn’t absurd, but Bergevin is going to have to do more than cite “character and experience” as reasons as to why this move is a smart one for the Canadiens.

Briere’s best days are surely behind him, but the outrage is over the top. There’s a large contingent of Habsland that prefers being right than to see the Canadiens succeed, so these people will not issue any credit even if Briere does make his mark on the powerplay, in shootouts or anywhere else for that matter. Many of these same fans are also holding fast to their six-year-old-grudge when Briere rejected the Canadiens as a free agent. Many still are masking their fear with anger that Bergevin added a French player “as a PR stunt”.

However this plays out, it is not a move that will cripple the Canadiens. It’s no better than a sideways move, and it paves the way for the trade of other small players like David Desharnais, or Brian Gionta at some point. To think of the Canadiens carrying Briere, Desharnais, Plekanec, Gallagher, and Gionta at the same time is stupefying. To have five of nine forwards measuring less than six feet tall is a disconcerting thought to say the least, but let’s give Bergevin more credit than this. He has to know by now that this is untenable and maybe bringing in Briere is the first domino that will trigger a series of moves that sees the Habs kicking off the 2013-14 campaign as a better team.

We’ve long believed that Quebec-born players that return to Montreal to play with the Habs always seem to struggle under the weight of expectations. If we keep our expectations in check, and be honest with ourselves that a 50-point year from Briere would be a success, then this isn’t the end of the world. While Briere and Desharnais (while he’s here) will surely get tons of sheltered minutes, protection, offensive zone starts and more powerplay time than they probably deserve, we can hope that fulfilling a dream, as Briere put it, will help him find a late-career second wind that makes his addition a positive one, and not something that will be a constant, unerring source of frustration for the next two seasons.

It’s all we’ve got, right?


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