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Validation for Subban

If Sportsnet’s Nick Kypreos is right, and Canadiens defenseman P.K. Subban  is about to win the Norris trophy as the league’s best rearguard, then it’s validation on a few different levels.

Validation that Subban is not only the team’s best defenseman, but also their best player (so much for those who think Markov, capable as he is in his own right, is still the team’s leader on defense)

Validation that Marc Bergevin goofed in only awarding a two-year deal instead of opting for the long-term deal that many fans felt should have been a no-brainer.

Validation (from Bergevin’s point of view) that he provided Subban with the proper motivation to turn in an astounding season.

Validation that the silly rhetoric that the league and the surrounding media “doesn’t like Subban” due to his flamboyant, exuberant personality.

It had to be in the back of Bergevin’s mind that this could have been an outcome for Subban, and that the team would have to open up the vault in order to keep Subban happy long-term. Instead of paying Subban what most believed would have gotten him signed long-term last year (five years, 25 million dollars), he gambled that he would retain leverage in further negotiations with a short “bridge” deal. Bergevin may have used his hammer to keep the cost-controlled Subban in check, but that won’t work next time, if Bergevin is as smart as we all think and hope he is. The bridge deal was a de facto challenge to Subban: “show us what you can do and we’ll have no problem paying you”. Careful what you wish for, Marc! What became more and more obvious as the lockout-shortened season progressed is that the price to re-sign Subban was growing bigger with each passing game, to the point where “Doughty money” now seems the starting point as opposed to the end point. Subban, even as an RFA will have the luxury to name his price, and Bergevin will have little choice but to play ball.

Remember those people who said that Subban wasn’t worth Doughty money? They’ve likely changed their tune now. Those holdovers that still insist that 42 games shouldn’t grant Subban the right to back up the truck in order to collect his pay, but those people are harder to find these days and will soon be extinct.

There is a full 82-game season coming this fall, followed by what we hope will be a lengthy playoff run, and there’s no telling what may happen. Subban could continue his excellent play (smart money is on this option). He could suffer a dip in production and overall quality of play (hard to imagine), or he could get hurt and miss a large chunk of time. Bergevin can soon choose to re-open negotiations with Subban about a long-term deal that will keep him here for many years to come. Is that the smart play, financially speaking given that Subban will have a fresh trophy in his case? Or should he gamble yet again that he can gain the upper hand by waiting?

Either way, the Canadiens have a defenseman that is finally worthy of being called the league’s best. Not a top-five, or top-ten defenseman. The best defenseman. At just 23 years old, it’s a staggering thought to think that he has already risen to such a high level when most of his peers only peak in their late-20’s or even early 30’s.

If Subban is still only scratching the surface of his potential, then he will not only add more hardware to his mantle, but he will validate what he told Bob Gainey on the day he was drafted: that he would help this team win a Stanley Cup.


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